Tips for wine lovers

Tips for wine lovers

Helpful tricks for every situation

For the perfect wine enjoyment, more than just the right storage is important. On our small top list for wine connoisseurs, you will find the hottest tips for selecting the right glass, ensuring the proper serving temperature and finding which glass is suitable for which wine.

Tip 1: Red wine and fish never go together? Wrong!

Many people are guided by the rule of thumb that red wine goes with meat and fish is best accompanied by white wine. If the meat is grilled, roasted or stewed, the resulting roasting flavours harmonise particularly well with tannic and strong red wines. For fish, these substances usually do not fit. However, there are exceptions: if the fish is grilled, you can dare to serve it with a red wine without too many tannins. If you roast the fish in bacon, it is also suitable for red wine, especially in combination with fried potatoes, beetroot or mushrooms.

tip 1 klarstein wine guide

Tip 2: The right drinking temperature

  • Strong, high-quality red wine 16 to 18 degrees
  • Light red wine 14 to 16 degrees
  • Dry, light white wine 8 to 10 degrees
  • Spicy, semi-dry white wine 9 to 12 degrees
  • Sparkling wines 8 to 10 degrees
tip 2 klarstein wine guide

Tip 3: Choosing the right wine glass

Red wine:

For red wine, look for more bulbous glasses with a wide opening. This allows you to swish the wine to give it air. As a result, lighter, fruity wines such as a Dornfelder or a Chianti can develop well. Tannin-rich wines, such as Bordeaux, Barolo, Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon need more oxygen to develop their full aroma. For this purpose, even more bulbous, larger glasses are suitable.

Red wine

Rosé and white wine:

White or rosé wines need slimmer and smaller glasses than red wine. This enables the flavours to bundle so they can develop better in the mouth and nose. These wines require less air to breathe than red wine, which is why decanting is usually not necessary. These glasses are ideal for wines such as Weißburgunder or Grauburgunder, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc or Silvaner.

Rosé and white wine

Sparkling wine:

For sparkling wine, so-called flutes are recommended. These are much longer and narrower than red or white wine glasses. This means that the carbon dioxide is retained longer to ensure a tingling drinking experience. Incidentally, the elegant-looking champagne flutes are not to be recommended, as the carbon dioxide escapes faster through the large opening and the champagne quickly becomes stale.

Sparkling wine
Red wine

Red wine:

For red wine, look for more bulbous glasses with a wide opening. This allows you to swish the wine to give it air. As a result, lighter, fruity wines such as a Dornfelder or a Chianti can develop well. Tannin-rich wines, such as Bordeaux, Barolo, Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon need more oxygen to develop their full aroma. For this purpose, even more bulbous, larger glasses are suitable.

Rosé and white wine

Rosé and white wine:

White or rosé wines need slimmer and smaller glasses than red wine. This enables the flavours to bundle so they can develop better in the mouth and nose. These wines require less air to breathe than red wine, which is why decanting is usually not necessary. These glasses are ideal for wines such as Weißburgunder or Grauburgunder, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc or Silvaner.

Sparkling wine

Sparkling wine:

For sparkling wine, so-called flutes are recommended. These are much longer and narrower than red or white wine glasses. This means that the carbon dioxide is retained longer to ensure a tingling drinking experience. Incidentally, the elegant-looking champagne flutes are not to be recommended, as the carbon dioxide escapes faster through the large opening and the champagne quickly becomes stale.

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